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Autism Research – Current Projects

Researchers: List Your Research Project Here

If you are involved in autism research and looking for research participants, you are invited to submit your research project using this form:  Amaze Research Project Application Form

Current Research Projects – Looking for Research Participants >

> Exploring factors that impact healthcare access for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Victoria, Australia.

Self-esteem and perceived personal control over sibling’s mental health issues: Influences on affiliate stigma

How well do you move your focus of attention?

Can children with high-functioning autism plan for future events?

Sleeping Sound with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Transition from paediatric to adult dental services for patients with Autism in Victoria, Australia

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Fine Motor Skills, Social Function and Adaptive Function in Autism Spectrum Disorder

ALLPLAY: Correlates and outcomes of NAB-AFL Auskick participation for primary school-aged children with disabilities

The ASD restricted and repetitive behaviours survey research

The Social and Emotional Well-being of Females with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Does it differ from Males with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, and from typical students?

Sleeping Sound Special Needs

> Can Children with high functioning autism plan for future events?

Exploring factors that impact healthcare access for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Victoria, Australia

Researcher: Shenae Calleja, Associate Professor Rachael McDonald, Dr Fakir M Amirul Islam and Dr Jonathan Kingsley,

Study Aim: There are many factors that impact the healthcare access for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). There is a lack of health service research for this population and to increase the quality of health service practice, the barriers and enablers must be explored and defined to impact change. The study aims to better understand the experiences, stressors and health access needs of adults with ASD by conducting face to face interviews and surveys. These findings will have important implications for clinicians, health service providers and researchers to develop more meaningful, appropriate and evidence-based interventions in the future.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate:

  • People over the age of 18 and have a confirmed clinical primary diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder or Asperger’s Syndrome, living in Melbourne, Victoria.
  • A primary caregiver (over the age of 18) of an adult over the age of 18 with a confirmed clinical primary diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder or Asperger’s Syndrome, living in Melbourne, Victoria.
What is involved for participants: Participants will engage in face-to-face interviews relating to their experiences, stressors and health access needs of adults with ASD and/or supporting an adult with ASD. Participants will be asked about their health and wellbeing. In addition to the interviews, participants with ASD will be asked to complete two surveys. One before the interview and one after the interview.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact one of the researchers below:

Shenae Calleja
PhD Candidate
scalleja@swin.edu.au

Associate Professor Rachael McDonald
Primary Supervisor
rachaelmcdonald@swin.edu.au

Dr Fakir M Amirul Islam
Coordinating Supervisor
fislam@swin.edu.au

Dr Jonathan Kingsley
Associate Supervisor
jkingsley@swin.edu.au

Research ends: 01/12/2019

 

Self-esteem and perceived personal control over sibling’s mental health issues: Influences on affiliate stigma

Researcher: Chief Investigator Professor Jenny Sharples and Student Researcher Melissa Alemis

Study aim: This study aims to investigate some influences (i.e., self-esteem and perceived personal control) on the extent that siblings internalise family stigma about having a brother or sister with a mental health issue(s).

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Siblings (aged 18 years or above) of people with a diagnosed mental health issue(s).

What is involved for participants: Completion of an online survey that will take approximately 10 to 15 minutes.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Student Researcher Melissa Alemis
Email: melissa.kerlin@live.vu.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9919 4448

Contact: Professor Jenny Sharples
Email: jenny.sharples@vu.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9919 4448

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 06/02/2020

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Dance and children with disability: experiences of dance schools, dance teachers, parents and children

Researcher: Emily Chan, Dr. Tamara May

Study aim: Calling the Australian dance community! We are creating an inclusive dance resource to make dance accessible for children with disability!

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: If you are a parent of a child with a disability aged 1-18 years who is currently participating in dance, has in the past, or would like to in future, we invite you to participate in our survey to better understand how your child is included.

What is involved for participants: Participation involves answering a survey exploring you and your child’s views of dance participation which will take around 20 minutes to complete and contains 68 questions. Your child will also answer a brief survey exploring their experiences of dance participation if you believe they are able to and wish to. The child survey will take approximately 5 minutes to complete.

http://allplaydance.org.au/dance-surveys/

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Dr. Tamara May (Researcher)
Email: tamara.may@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9244 5084

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 01/05/2018

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Pathways Beyond Diagnosis: Supporting Parents Following a Child’s Diagnosis of Autism

Researcher: Stacey Rabba (PhD Candidate), Cheryl Dissanayake (Supervisor), and Josephine Barbaro (Supervisor).

Study aim: By better understanding parents’ past experiences of diagnosis, we can provide families of newly diagnosed young children with the support they need to understand autism, promote family wellbeing and ensure they feel equipped with tools to navigate the pathways beyond diagnosis.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Parents of preschool aged children with an autism diagnosis.

What is involved for participants: Parents are invited to participate in an online survey.

We invite you to participate in our research project designed to better support families and provide further guidance in the future. It will involve completion of an online survey, which has questions about your demographics (e.g., your gender, age at which your child was diagnosed) and questionnaires relating to parent and family wellbeing, reaction to diagnosis, and quality of life. The survey should take approximately 20-30 minutes to complete.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: PhD Candidate Stacey Rabba
Email: s.rabba@latrobe.edu.au

Telephone: (03) 9479 3271

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 1/12/2018

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Understanding the well-being of parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researcher: Gal Rachel Bohadana

Study aim:Study aim: To understand the factors that influence the well-being of parents raising a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This information will help inform an intervention for parents at a later phase of the project.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Parents of children with a verified diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder aged 6-12 years.

What is involved for participants: Parents will be asked to complete an approximate 30 minute online survey by following this link: goo.gl/zc98m8

The Password for the survey is 1234

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Cal Bohadana
Email: gal.bohadana@griffithuni.edu.au

Telephone: 0451 181 501

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 18/10/2018

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Exploring the social-emotional and academic experiences of adolescent girls on the autism spectrum during the first two years of secondary school

Researcher: Pam Jacobs Griffith University PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Wendi Beamish Griffith University (07) 373 55636 w.beamish@griffith.edu.au
Dr Loraine McKay Griffith University (07) 373 55682 loraine.mckay@griffith.edu.au
Dr Denise Wood Charles Sturt University (02) 6338 4698 dwood@csu.edu.au

Study aim: This study aims to find out about the experiences and perspectives of girls on the autism spectrum in the first two years of secondary school. The findings of this study will contribute to the literature about girls on the autism spectrum and inform schools about how to maximise positive educational experiences for girls on the autism spectrum at secondary / high school .

Selection criteria/Who can Participate:

1. Girls on the autism spectrum
2. In the first two years of secondary / high school (between the ages of 12 and 14 years)
3. Live in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria or ACT.
What is involved for participants: Participants will be asked to complete an online survey that will take about 30 minutes.

Participants may have help to complete the survey. The questions will be about things like beginning secondary school, friendships, feelings about school and the help received (e.g. school staff and friends, special considerations, headphones etc.). Participants can volunteer for further research (Stage2) at the end of the survey if they chose.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Pam Jacobs
Email: pam.jacobs@griffithuni.edu.au

Telephone: +61 489 911 686

Stage 1 Survey Research ends: 30/07/2018

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Clinical Trial using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques to reduce inflexible behaviours and improve emotional regulation in autism spectrum disorders

Researcher: Dr Natalia Albeins-Urios

Study aim: Some people with a diagnosis of autism, Asperger’s syndrome or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) struggle when their routine changes and/or find difficult to manage their emotions. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether high definition transcranial magnetic stimulation (HD-tDCS), a form of non-invasive brain stimulation technique, can reduce inflexible behaviours and improve emotional regulation. HD-tDCS is a safe technique that emits a weak electrical current through 5 small electrodes placed in the right side of your head.

What is involved for participants: The clinical trial involves 8 intervention session. Before and after the sessions you will complete some psychological and cognitive assessments.
The information gathered from this study will be used to gain a better understanding of the motor and neurological dysfunctions in ASD and PD, will help to better understand the underlying causes of ASD, significantly improve diagnostic outcomes for both these conditions; and may potentially have future treatment applications.

Participants will be compensated for their time with a $20 gift voucher for each assessment session (four assessment sessions) and $15 gift voucher for attending each intervention session (eight intervention sessions).

Participants: We are inviting young people (16-30 years old) with a diagnosis of autism, Asperger’s syndrome or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to participate in a clinical trial within the Cognitive Neuroscience Unit (CNU), School of Psychology, Deakin University (Burwood campus).

What does the study involve?: This clinical trial involves 8 intervention session, four consecutive daily sessions of a non-invasive brain stimulation technique called high definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) and four consecutive daily sessions of non-active (placebo) sessions. HD-tDCS is a safe technique that emits a weak electrical current through 5 small electrodes placed in the right side of your head. This stimulation typically produces a light tingling and warming sensation on the head.

The goal of this study is to determine whether HD-tDCS reduces inflexible behaviours and improves your ability to manage your emotions. Before and after the stimulation sessions you will attend several sessions where the principal researcher will conduct psychological assessments. You will be compensated for your time.

Who is eligible?
1. People aged between 16 to 30 years old with a diagnosis of autism, Asperger’s syndrome or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with average/above average cognitive function (or IQ at least 55), and right-handed. Individuals under the age of 18 require parental consent to take part.
2. People without a serious medical condition (e.g. epilepsy).

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Dr. Natalia Albein-Urios
Email: natalia.albeinurios@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9251 7813
If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 31/12/2018

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How well do you move your focus of attention?

Researcher: Shuting Li (PhD student), A/Prof Katherine Johnson (supervisor), the University of Melbourne

Study aim: This project aims to enhance the understanding of how people with autism move their focus of attention, which we believe to be an important part of social life.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Individuals with a current diagnosis of ASD, aged 10 years and above, verbally fluent in English, without intelligent disability, and without colour blindness. Participants under 18 years of age will require a parent/caregiver to sign the consent form.

What is involved for participants: There will be 2 separate sessions.

1. An assessment of your diagnosis of ASD based on one-one-one activities. 45 to 60 minutes.

2. Some computer-based and paper-based tasks. Around 1.5 hours.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Shuting Li (PhD student)
Email: shutingl1@student.unimelb.edu.au

Telephone: 0422608645

Contact: A/Prof Katherine Johnson (Supervisor)
Email: kajo@unimelb.edu.au

Telephone: 03 8344 6349

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 01/03/2021

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Can children with high-functioning autism plan for future events?

Researcher: Serene (Jiu-Swan) Chua

Study aim: Have you ever wondered why your child simply can’t plan ahead?

The School of Psychology at the Australian Catholic University is conducting a research study on future thinking in children with autism spectrum disorder. Future thinking is an ability to mentally travel forward in time to imagine ourselves experiencing future events. We’re interested in understanding whether this ability is affected in children with autism spectrum disorder, and if so, the extent of its impact on their daily living skills.

We hope that our findings will provide further insights into children’s thinking patterns and in turn inform professionals to implement appropriate strategies at home and in the classroom to promote each child’s learning potential.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Children aged 8-12 years who have high-functioning autism or Asperger’s syndrome.

What is involved for participants: Your child will play two computer games, do some puzzle-like activities and answer a range of verbally presented questions. These tasks will be completed over two sessions which take approximately 1-2 hours in each session. A mutually convenient time and place can be arranged with the researcher. One adult and one child movie voucher will be offered to thank you for your participation.

The parent/carer can participate whether or not their child received their adolescent immunisations.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Serene Chua (Researcher)
Email: jiuswan.chua3@myacu.edu.au

Telephone: 0490 307 412

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 25/07/2019

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Sleeping Sound with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Researcher: Susannah Bellows

Study aim:
• Up to 85% of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) can experience sleep problems.
• Sleeping Sound is a brief treatment program for sleep problems. Early findings in children with developmental challenges have suggested that this program can improve their sleeping difficulties.
• This study aims to see whether the program improves sleep problems, as well as wellbeing and daily functioning in primary school aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: We are seeking families with children:

  • Aged between Primary school aged (5-13 years)
  • With sleeping difficulties
  • With a confirmed diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder without Intellectual Disability
  • Living in Victoria, Australia

What is involved for participants:
If eligible, you and your child will be randomly allocated to either:
1. The Sleeping Sound treatment program, which involves two free face-face treatment sessions with a trained clinician OR
2. The treatment as usual group.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

To get more information or to register your interest:

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: We will be enrolling families until September 2018.

 

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Transition from paediatric to adult dental services for patients with Autism in Victoria, Australia

Researcher: Claudia Patricia Lopez Silva

Study aim: This study is about developing an understanding of the current oral health situation of adolescents with autism including the views of parents and carers.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Individuals with autism aged between 15 and 19 years of age and their parents and carers.

What is involved for participants: A 2-hour voice-recorded interview between yourself and your parent/carer and the researchers to identify factors associated with transitions to adult dental care. This will take place at a centre you currently visit or other venue suitable to you.
We will ask you questions about your dental health and your experience in what dental care you have had and are currently having.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Supervisor: A/Prof Mina Borromeo (Specialist, Special Needs Dentistry)

Email: Mina.Borromeo@monash.edu

Telephone: 03 9094 9528

Researcher: Dr Claudia Patricia Lopez Silva (Specialist in Training, Special Needs Dentistry)

Telephone: 03 9341 1529

Email: claudial1@student.unimelb.edu.au

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends:  31/12/2022

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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers: Peter Donaldson

Study aim: Researchers from Deakin University, Monash University, and The Alfred are currently looking for participants to take part in a new study that investigates whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can improve social understanding and social communication in people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Participants must be aged between 14 and 30 years and have a diagnosis of ASD or Asperger’s. Participants under 18 years will require a parent or guardian to provide informed consent.

Participants will be asked to attend multiple sessions over a 12-month period at The Alfred, Monash University, and (if more convenient) Deakin University. Participants will undergo MRI brain scans, TMS sessions, and clinical assessments.

What is involved for participants: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a safe and non-invasive means of changing activity within specific areas of the brain. It is used in the treatment of depression, but there is also preliminary research suggesting that it could be effective in ASD.

You cannot take part in this study if you have ever had a seizure or have been assessed as having a moderate or severe intellectual disability. There are other factors that can prevent participation.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Peter Donaldson (Researcher)
Email: peter.donaldson@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: (03) 9246 8775

OR

Contact: A/Prof. Peter Enticott
Email: peter.enticott@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: (03) 9244 5504

Research ends: 19/4/2019

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Fine Motor Skills, Social Function and Adaptive Function in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers:  Joel Crucitti

Study aim/background: Greater attention is required on how motor skills, particularly basic motor control and dyspraxia, predict the severity of autism. The proposed study seeks to address this.

Who can participate: The study will be recruiting male and females between the ages of 4 and 10 years with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis.

What is involved for participants: The study will involve testing the child’s fine motor skills for 20-30 minutes at two time points, approximately 8 months apart.  It is hypothesised that an improvement in fine motor skills will predict the child’s change in social and adaptive skills.

These motor skills are tested at the participants’ home. Parents will also be asked to complete questionnaires requiring approximately 90 minutes of their time at each of the two time points. Questionnaires will measure the child’s social and adaptive skills, and are completed in the parents’ own time.

Contact: If you are interested in finding out more about this project or becoming a participant, please contact the researcher/s below:

Contact: Joel Crucitti

Email: joel.crucitti@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 5227 1100

Research ends: 31/12/2019

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ALLPLAY: Correlates and outcomes of NAB-AFL Auskick participation for primary school-aged children with disabilities

Researchers:  Dr Carmel Sivaratnam (Senor Research Fellow)

Study aim/background: This study examines the impact of participation in organised physical activity, particularly the NAB AFL Auskick program for children with disabilities such as ASD. We are looking to recruit children with ASD who will be enrolling in AusKick for 2018, AND children who do not take part in any sport or physical activity (control group).

Who can participate: Based on the stories of young people with impairments , this study seeks to produce new knowledge about when and how and where discrimination happens to young people with disabilities in public places o the effort can be made to prevent such discriminatory acts in the future.

What is involved for participants: Participation will involve attending 2 sessions lasting between 90 and 120 minutes each, where your child will complete a number of cognitive and motor measures together with an experienced researcher. Your child will also answer a number of brief audio-recorded interview exploring their view of the benefits and barriers to participation in organised physical activity.

During the session, you will receive with a number of questionnaires about your child’s social and emotional functioning, as well as a brief questionnaire about their participation in physical activity. On request, the researchers can provide you with a summary of your child’s motor and cognitive functioning from our study assessments.

Sessions will be held at Deakin University in Burwood or Geelong (Warun Ponds), depending on your preference, and you will be reimbursed for parking costs. All participants that complete the two sessions will also be reimbursed a $60 gift voucher for their research involvement.

Feel free to register your interest in the study and the link below

http://www.AllPlayFooty.org/

Contact: Dr. Carmel Sivaratnam

Email: carmel.sivaratnam@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9246 8383 extension 95240

This study is funded by a philanthropic donation from Moose Toys. The Chief Investigator of this study is Professor Nicole Rinehart.

Research ends: 29/11/2020

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The ASD Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours Survey Research

Researchers:  Professor Andrew Cashin

Study aim/background:  While central to the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) restrictive and repetitive behaviours often change over time and increase and decrease in intensity. We are not clear, however why this happens, typical patterns, and we definitely have no structured way of predicting when someone will get locked into these behaviours.

Who can participate: This survey forms part of the process of developing this knowledge. The survey is for parents and or guardians of people with ASD engaged in some form of primary or secondary schooling (in the approximate age range of 6-18 years). This includes parents and guardians of people with the diagnosis of ASD, Asperger’s Disorder, Autistic Disorder or Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (PDDnos).

What is involved for participants: What does the study involve? We understand the time and energy required to parent a person with ASD and very much appreciate the time taken to complete this survey. The survey will take approximately 25 minutes to complete. Answers can be saved and the survey completed at a later time if needed. The survey can be taken on the computer or mobile devices like smart phones or tablets.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

This research is conducted by Professor Andrew Cashin of Southern Cross University, Australia.

The research has been approved by the Southern Cross University Human Research Ethics Committee (approval ECN-16-249). For any concerns related to the ethical conduct of this research please contact the chair of the human research ethics committee Southern Cross University ethics.lismore@scu.edu.au.

For any questions related to the survey please contact:

Contact: Professor Andrew Cashin
Email: andrew.cashin@scu.edu.au

Completion of the survey will be considered consent.

Research ends: 30/04/2019

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The Social and Emotional Well-being of Females with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Does it differ from Males with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, and from typical students?

Researchers:  Belinda Jarman

Study aim/background:  This study aims to contribute to an understanding of situations at school which many impact the social and emotional wellbeing of female students with HFASD/AS during their schooling, and how this compares to their mail counterpart, and to typical females and males.

Who can participate: Parents of male and female children aged between 7 and 14 years with high functioning Autism/Asperger’s Syndrome.

What is involved for participants: What does the study involve?

Completing an anonymous online survey. To access the survey follow this link.

Research Survey Link

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researchers below:

Student Investigator Belinda Jarman
Email: belinda.jarman@utas.edu.au

Or

Chief Investigator Dr Christopher Rayner
Email: christopher.rayner@utas.edu.au

Or

Co-Investigator Dr Nadia Ollington
Email: nadia.ollington@utas.edu.au
Or

Co-Investigator Professor Kim Beswick
Email: kim.beswick@utas.edu.au

Research ends: 31/12/2019

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Can children with high functioning autism plan for future events?

Researchers: Serene Chua (Master of Psychology/PhD candidate), Deborah Clayton (Masters of Psychology candidate) and Associate Professor Gill Terrett

Study aim: The presence of repetitive and restricted patterns of behaviour is commonly observed in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet this characteristic is still currently not well understood. Inflexible behaviours in ASD have recently been linked to the possible compromised ability to imagine future events known as future thinking. At the Australian Catholic University, we are researching whether future thinking may be affected in children with ASD. We hope that our findings will shed light on the inflexible behaviours observed in these children and enable effective training and/or accommodations to be made by teachers and parents at home and in the classroom to promote each child’s learning potential.

Who can participate: Participants can be children aged 8-12 years who have high functioning autism spectrum disorder or Asperger’s Syndrome. Children who do not have a developmental disorder are also welcome to participate.

Participation involves: Your child will play two computer games, do some puzzle-like tests and answer a range of verbally presented questions. These tasks will be completed over two sessions which will take approximately 1-2 hours in each session. A mutually convenient time and place can be arranged with the researchers. One adult and one child movie ticket will be offered to thank you for your participation.

Contact: For more information or to participate, please contact:

Serene Chua at jiuswan.chua@myacu.edu.au

Mobile: 0490 307 412

OR

Deborah Clayton at ellen.mcdermott@myacu.edu.au

Mobile: 0490 320 126

This project is supervised by Associate Professor Gill Terrett: Gill.Terrett@acu.edu.au, (03) 9953 3121

Research ends: 31/5/2019

 

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Page updated: 22-11-16