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Autism Research – Current Projects

Researchers: List Your Research Project Here

If you are involved in autism research and looking for research participants, you are invited to submit your research project using this form: Submit ASD Research Project

Current Research Projects – Looking for Research Participants >

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Investigating global and local adaptation in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and typically developed adults

Are girls less likely to be diagnosed than boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder?

Visual Attention and Emotional Engagement in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

“How was your day?”

Autism and Anxiety

Emotion Regulation in Adults

Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Australia: Transition to Adulthood

Using self-management intervention to increase compliance in a lower grade student with Autism Spectrum Disorder in mainstream school

> Can Children with high functioning autism plan for future events?

Comprehensive and unique profile of Australian ASD school leavers

> How does the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder affect parental stress?

> Planning for Leaving School.

> Monitoring the effect of the NDIS on Australian Parents of individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder.

> Health and Wellbeing in Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

> Parental Stress, in families with a typically developing child and a child Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Influences of gender and birth order.

> The effect of pet ownership on the social skills and empathy of people with ASD.

> Landmark six-year study of participation and learning outcomes for children with autism.

> The Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

> Online Communication and Collaborative Problem Solving Skills in Adolescents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typically Developing Peers.

 

Investigating global and local adaptation in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and typically developed adults

Researchers:Jeroen van Boxtel and Chiara Killey

Study aim:This study aims to replicate and extend previous findings that have evidenced perceptual adaptation differences between adults with ASD and typically developed (TD) individuals, in the context of human movement. If differences are observed in adaptation to biological motion, this may assist with understanding how individuals with ASD perceive and interpret bodily movement differently. This may assist in understanding social cognition in ASD.

Who can participate: We are looking for male and female volunteers with high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), aged 18+, with no significant visual or neurological impairments, to take part in a study examining whether traits that are generally associated with autism are related to the process of adapting to stimuli.

Participation involves: It will involve completing an electronic questionnaire relating to social interests, a brief IQ measure and a simple visual task on a standard PC, which involves looking at stimuli, and responding based on your perception. Your participation will take between 1 ½ and 2 hours. In appreciation for your time, you will receive $15 per hour.

Contact: If you are interested, please contact Chiara Killey at Monash University, School of Psychological Sciences:
Email: cmkil1@student.monash.edu.au

Contact: This study has been reviewed by, and received ethics clearance
by the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee. – MUHREC Approval CF16/624 – 2016000302

Research ends: 01/06/2017

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Are girls less likely to be diagnosed than boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder?

Researchers: Ivanna Cox

Study aim:To help us understand how many girls may not appear to have a diagnosis of Autism while boys can easily be detected. So we need to find boys and girls that don’t have a diagnosis as well as some who might.

Who can participate: Siblings ages 6 – 18 years and parents of a child diagnosed with ASD.

Participation involves: Parents completing a questionnaire of your participating child’s daily functioning and providing information on their development (approximately one hour). Participating children undertake brief IQ and language tests (30-40 minutes), a behaviour assessment (ADOS-2 40 – 60 minutes), and complete questionnaires that assess for ASD features.

Benefits: A report of your child’s intellectual, language and behavioural profile of strengths and difficulties.

Contact: If you are interested, please contact Ivanna Cox at Deakin University:
Email: iac@deakin.edu.au

Contact: Principle Researcher: Assoc. Prof Mark Stokes at Deakin University:
Email: mark.stokes@deakin.edu.au

Research ends: 01/06/2017

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Visual Attention and Emotional Engagement in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers: Dr Grace Thompson

Study aim: We invite you and your child to participate in this innovative study aiming to better understand how to motivate visual attention and emotional engagement in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
We are going to explore two different activities – music and speech – and compare them to discover the similarities and differences in the children’s visual attention and emotional engagement.

To take part, your child will need to:
• Be aged 7-10 years old
• Have a confirmed diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder
• Be able to sit and watch approximately 4 minutes of videos of songs and story telling (you will need to attend this session with your child, and will also have a phone call with the researchers to help get ready for the assessment). The assessment session will take place at The University of Melbourne, Parkville)
• Have no hearing or visual impairment

Contact: If you are interested, please contact Dr Grace Thompson at the University of Melbourne:

Email: graceat@unimelb.edu.au
Phone number: +61 3 9035 8978

Research ends: 31/12/2016

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“How was your day?”

Researchers: Lesley Stirling and Lindsay Pamment

Study aim: The Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre (OTARC), University of Melbourne and the Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism are running a new research study, investigating how children with ASD speak about their day at school. “How was your day?” is looking in particular at the conversations that take place in the home. You will help us to understand the various ways in which children with an ASD communicate and converse about their school day, which will also help us to define any potential barriers which may ultimately be impairing their ability to enjoy school, and succeed at school to their fullest.

Who can participate: We are inviting parents who have a child with an ASD in Grades 4, 5 or 6 (aged about 8-12 years) at a mainstream Victorian primary school, and who speak English at home.
What does participating involve? As the parent/primary caregiver, you will be required to complete an information pack. You will then record two natural conversations between you and your child on two different days (audio-visual equipment will be provided as well as instructions and support). At the end of the week the child will be invited to complete a short survey interview.

Contact: Lindsay Pamment, lindsay.pamment@unimelb.edu.au

Research ends: 30/12/2016

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Autism and Anxeity

Researchers: Mirko Uljarević, Amanda Richdale & Andrew Halim

Study aim: Anxiety in adults with an Autism Spectrum Condition is poorly understood, and to date there has been little research to understand their experience with anxiety, specifically in the vital transition period from school to adulthood. The move from school to adult life can be an extremely challenging and stressful time for people with an Autism Spectrum Condition. This study aims to understanding anxiety in adults with an Autism Spectrum Condition, how it is experienced, and how this differs from individuals without an Autism Spectrum Condition.

Selection criteria: 18 – 40 year old adults with an Autism Spectrum Condition, as well as adults who have a diagnosis of anxiety but don’t have Autism.

What is involved for participants: Participants will be invited to be a part of a small focus group where they will be able to share experiences and views of anxiety, to describe what it is like for them, and how it feels. They will also be asked to complete a Q-sort task in which they are asked to sort a series of statements, and participate in a group discussion/interview about their experiences of anxiety.

Contact: Mr Andrew Halim 17071843@students.latrobe.edu.au or Dr Mirko Uljarevic m.uljarevic@latrobe.edu.au

Research ends: 30/12/2016

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Emotion Regulation in Adults

Researchers: Amanda Richdale, Mirko Uljarević & Ru Ying Cai

Funding: Autism CRC

Study aim: Emotion regulation is the ability to control our behaviour in response to an emotion we feel, such as anger, anxiety, frustration, joy. In the general population research has shown that ability to regulate one’s emotion is associated with a range of positive outcomes, such as academic, employment and social success. On the other hand, inability to control one’s emotion can lead to psychopathology. But there has not been much research with individuals diagnosed with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) to see whether the same applies to them. Hence, the aim of the study is to explore the relationship between emotion regulation and associated outcomes in adults diagnosed with ASC.

What is involved for participants: Participant will be asked to complete an online survey, attend a one-on-one session at the Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, and complete a 5-day diary on emotions they experience in their daily life and how they regulate them.

Contact: Ms Ru Ying Cai r.cai@latrobe.edu.au or Dr Mirko Uljarevic d.uljarevic@latrobe.edu.au

Research ends: 30/12/2016

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Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Australia: Transition to Adulthood

The purpose of this research project is to identify factors that support, and factors that are barriers to a successful transition to adulthood after high school. Transition is defined as the shift from school to employment, tertiary education, independent living and social interaction as a young adult. This research is aimed at young adults aged 18-25 with ASD.

The research team at the University of Southern Queensland requests your assistance through the completion of the online survey. This should take no longer than 30 minutes of your time. If you would like to participate in the survey please click on the following link:

Survey Link: https://usqadfi.au1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6feu4EWVr6y3BGt

Principal Researcher: Yosheen Pillay
Yosheen.Pillay@usq.edu.au
Facebook: www.Autism.Transition.Research

Research ends: 31/10/2016

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Using self-management intervention to increase compliance in a lower grade student with Autism Spectrum Disorder in mainstream school

Have the teachers told you that it is difficult to get your child to follow their instructions in school?

We are looking for a Year 1 or 2 child diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder who is currently enrolled in a private school (with independent or Catholic school). The teachers have given feedback to you that it is difficult to get your child to comply with their instructions in the school.

This research study aims to understand the effectiveness of getting your children in mainstream primary schools to be compliant through the use of self-management strategies.

This project will take place entirely in a school setting. The researcher will conduct teacher interviews and observations of your child in the school. The researcher will also work with your child to teach him/her how to monitor and manage his/her own behaviour during this study. After the intervention, the researcher will continue to observe your child to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. As this is a small-scaled intervention study, it is expected that the researcher will work intensively with your child and his/her teachers for 1 to 2 terms.

If you would like to participate in this research, please contact Ms Pei Ling Lee (student researcher) at pllee21@student.monash.edu or 0450 972 348

Research study is approved by Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee

Research ends: 31/10/2016

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Can children with high functioning autism plan for future events?

At the Australian Catholic University, we are researching how well children with autism spectrum disorder are able to imagine future events. This ability is important for planning ahead in daily life.

Who can participate?

Children aged 8-12 years, living in Melbourne, who have received a diagnosis of High Functioning Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome

What does the study involve?

Your child will play a computer game, do some puzzle-like tasks, use their imagination and answer a range or verbally presented questions. Testing will take approximately 2 hours and will be completed at a convenient location. One adult and one child movie ticket will be offered to thank you for your participation.

If you are interested in find out more or would like to participate, please contact:

Jiu-Swan (Serene) Chua: jiuswan.chua@myacu.edu.au, 0490 307 412 or Ellen McDermott: ellen.mcdermott@myacu.edu.au, 0490 320 126

This project is supervised by Associate Prof. Gill Terrett: gill.terrett@acu.edu.au, (03) 9953 3121

Research ends: 31/10/2016

 

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Comprehensive and unique profile of Australian ASD school leavers

Researchers from the Autism CRC and Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre are conducting a longitudinal study with the main aim of understanding the process of transitioning from school to adult life for Australian students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their families. For this purpose we are inviting young people with an autism spectrum condition who are in their final year of school, or first year post school (aged 15-25) and their parents or guardians, to participate in a longitudinal survey.

Research ends: 30/06/2017

To find out more, you can contact Dr Mirko Uljarevic (M.Uljarevic@latrobe.edu.au) or Ms Ru Ying Cai (R.Cai@latrobe.edu.au) or you can follow these two links:

http://www.autismcrc.com.au/longitudinal-study-school-leavers-autism

http://otarc.blogs.latrobe.edu.au/longitudinal-study-of-school-leavers-with-autism/

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How does the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder affect parental stress?

Australian caregivers of a child/children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) aged 18 and above, are invited to take part in an online study examining how the diagnosis of ASD in children affects parental stress!
Results will be used for a Master of Psychology (Clinical) thesis for Cairnmillar Institute which will contribute to a better understanding of families’ unique experiences of ASD and the relevance of family stressors and coping styles, in order to benefit treatment outcomes.
Please visit the website at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JXWSR2M
Or email 1360-14@cairnmillar.edu.au to receive the link.
The survey will take a maximum of 20 minutes and is completely anonymous.
Please feel free to contact: Student Research: Rebecca Mariani – 1360-14@cairnmillar.edu.au
Or Primary Supervisor: Bella Saunders – bella.saunders@cairnmillar.org.au if you require more information.
Your participation is greatly appreciated.

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Planning for Leaving School

Do you have a child in year 9, 10 or 11 with high functioning autism, Asperger’s Syndrome or PDD-NOS?
You can help us to develop an online program to help teens with high functioning autism to succeed when they finish school!
What does it involve?
You will complete a questionnaire at three separate times over one year. This will help us to develop the online transition planning program. You will be given the opportunity to use once it is developed.
What might the benefits be?
We hope this program will help teens with high functioning autism to succeed in going from school to further study and employment.
Get in Touch!
Please contact Megan Hatfield on 0402 200 636 or megan.hatfield@curtin.edu.au Please let us know the name of your child’s school.

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Monitoring the effect of the NDIS on Australian Parents of individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Parents of Individuals with Autism – The NDIA needs to hear your voice.
Matthew Snow, and Dr James Donnelly are undertaking vital research at SCU to identify the effects of the National Disability Insurance Scheme on Australian parents of individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. We would like to understand what factors influence program success or challenges, and carer wellbeing. This information will inform National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) policies.
If you would like to assist us with this important research you can access the survey here-

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/V77B8WZ

Approved by SCU Human Research Ethics – ECN-15-192

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Health and Wellbeing in Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

A research investigation into the effects of parenting a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), which specifically examines the role of social support, parenting self-efficacy, and child interventions and education services in improving the psychological health and wellbeing of parents of children with Autism. As part of this study, you are invited you to complete a brief online survey that will take approximately 30 minutes to complete. We are seeking parents of children with at least one child aged 4-12 years, with a diagnosis of ASD.
Participation in this study is completely voluntary and you may withdraw at any time without risking any negative consequences. You will not be required to provide your name, and all information will remain anonymous.
If you would like to participate or require further information, please click on the link below to access the study:

https://www.psychdata.com/s.asp?SID=166676

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Parental Stress, in families with a typically developing child and a child Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Influences of gender and birth order

This research project focuses on families and the influences that gender and birth order of the children have on parental stress. If you are a parent of two children and you are involved in their day-to day lives; and one child is under 12 years of age and diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or has an equivalent diagnosis e.g., Autism/Autistic Disorder; High functioning autism; Asperger’s Disorder/Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified), and one child is typically developing, we invite you to participate in this research.
Participation will involve completion of an online survey, which has questions about your gender, your children’s age and gender, and the age at which your child was diagnosed with ASD, as well as a questionnaire about parenting and factors that may be related to parental stress. The survey should take no more than 10 minutes of your time.

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The effect of pet ownership on the social skills and empathy of people with ASD

Who Can Take Part?
Anyone with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) aged 12 years and over.
Why are we conducting this research?
To provide Information regarding the role pets play in enhancing the social skills and empathy of people with ASD across the lifespan, as it could be a cost effective and viable option for many families.
What will it involve?
I will meet with participants personally at the time and place that suits the participant to complete two short questionnaires, and a parent/close person will also complete two questionnaires about pet ownership, empathy and social skills. Participation is anonymous and takes approx. 20 minutes.
How do I sign up?
If you would like to participate, or if you have any questions about this project, please contact Victoria by e-mail or phone:
petASDresearch@gmail.com or 0403 694 986
To thank you for your participation, you will have the opportunity to enter the draw to win a $50 JB Hi-Fi voucher.

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Landmark six-year study of participation and learning outcomes for children with autism

My name is Dr Jill Ashburner and I am the Manager of Research and Development at Autism Queensland. I am also a researcher with the Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Autism CRC), of which Autism Queensland is an essential participating organisation.

We would like to invite parents/caregivers of children with autism aged 4-5 years or 9-10 years during 2015 to participate in a research project.

We have little evidence about the transitions children with autism make into and out of primary and high school. Through our research with the Autism CRC, we hope to work with parents/caregivers to address current gaps in understanding and knowledge.

Our aim for this study is find out which factors improve or impede a child’s participation and improve their academic performance. To do this, we will follow children with autism over a six year period, collecting information from you along the way about your child’s strengths and difficulties in a range of areas and your family’s strengths and difficulties in raising a child with autism. Most of this information will be collected using an online questionnaire. The project team will provide you with a brief summary of your child’s outcomes for the questionnaires each year as well as keep you updated on the latest findings.

If you would like to take part in this study, or if you would like to find out more, please register at www.autismcrc.com.au/LASA. Once registered, a research team member will send you out a link for the parent questionnaire. If you would like more information or if you have any questions, please contact the project coordinator, Robyn Garland, at r.garland@griffith.edu.au

Please note that this study has been approved by the Mater Health Services Human Research Ethics Committee (Approval Number HREC/14/MHS/122).

We look forward to working with you to contribute to better understanding of the participation and learning outcomes for children with autism, and thank you for your consideration of this request.

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The Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

We are excited to announce that the Australian Longitudinal Study of Adults with Autism spectrum conditions (ALSAA) has been launched by the Autism CRC and the UNSW. We are seeking adults with Autism 25 years or older, or carers/family members of adults with autism who may be interested in taking part in a questionnaire-based study (either on line or on a paper copy). Questionnaires take approximately 2-3 hrs to complete and include questions about physical and mental health, employment, day activities, behaviour, sleep habits, coping skills, and sensory processing. If you are interested in taking part in this research, please contact the research team at autismcrc@unsw.edu.au, or phone (02) 93850620.

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Online Communication and Collaborative Problem Solving Skills in Adolescents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typically Developing Peers

Collaborative Problem Solving and Learning in Digital Networks have been identified as critical skills to develop in the Australian Curriculum. This study is designed to investigate whether adolescents with ASD have similar or different communication and learning profiles as their typically developing peers when collaborating to complete online problem solving tasks. Another research aim is to explore whether adolescents with an ASD demonstrate difficulties in communication in an online environment as reported in face-to-face interactions. This study will inform teaching practices for 21st century skills for students with ASD.
Students with an ASD diagnosis in Year 7-10 in mainstream education, and their parents, are invited to take part in this research study. A parent will complete an online 15-30 minute questionnaire. Adolescents will work with another student to complete online problem solving tasks (40-50 minutes), which can be arranged for convenience, and complete a brief online questionnaire (5-10 minutes).
Please click on the link to access further information about the study and register your interest in participation.

http://www.eSurveysPro.com/Survey.aspx?id=c463260f-8b27-40ec-a8db-608e7f5fb45a

If you would like further information please contact Master of Educational Psychology student Susannah Bellows: susannah.bellows@unimelb.edu.au

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Page updated: 22-08-16