Know what you're looking for?

Autism Research – Current Projects

Researchers: List Your Research Project Here

If you are involved in autism research and looking for research participants, you are invited to submit your research project using this form:  Amaze Research Project Application Form

Current Research Projects – Looking for Research Participants >

 

Predictor of family adaptation to parenting a child with autism spectrum disorder

Public library service provision with people with invisible disabilities

Sleeping Sound with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Relationship between intellectual ability, anxiety and sleep problems in adults on the autism spectrum

Transition from paediatric to adult dental services for patients with Autism in Victoria, Australia

Oral Health and Dental Needs of Autistic and Non-autistic Adults

Promoting bone and gut health in our Children (The PROUD Study)

The Motor Social Matrix: Improving our knowledge of social and motor understanding in children

Predicting Well-being of Parents of Children with Autism

Empirical Validation of a Model Predicting Depression, Anxiety and Stress in the Parents of Children with Autism

Supporting Families of Children with ASD in Australia

Informing an Autism (and Developmental Disability) – Friendly Children’s Centre at Cabrini

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Parent and Professional Perception of Apps for Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Exploring the need to belong: An online survey of autistic and typical adults

Fine Motor Skills, Social Function and Adaptive Function in Autism Spectrum Disorder

School non-attendance in students with intellectual disability (ID)

Stress and Coping in Teenagers with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

Unique Autism: Understanding differences between twins

Young People with disability and discrimination in public places

ALLPLAY: Correlates and outcomes of NAB-AFL Auskick participation for primary school-aged children with disabilities

A Survey of Barriers and Facilitators to Participation in Organised Physical Activity for Children with a Disability within the Australia Community

Thinking About Objects

The ASD restricted and repetitive behaviours survey research

The Social and Emotional Well-being of Females with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Does it differ from Males with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, and from typical students?

Investigating Motor and Language Function in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

How I’m feeling: Measuring depression and anxiety in adolescents with an intellectual disability

Dads and mums of children with ASD: Wellbeing and support use (ASD)

An Investigation of the symptom profiles of girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Autistic children and parental discipline – What do some parents and therapeutic professionals tell us about their views and experiences?

The experiences of dual enrolled students attending mainstream and special schools: The perspectives of students and their teachers

Clinical Trial using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques to reduce inflexible behaviours and improve emotional regulation in autism spectrum disorders

Evidence for shared neurobiology between Autism Spectrum Disorders and Parkinson’s disease

The Australian Wellbeing Project

Bodily sensation topography and self-report evaluations of interoceptive awareness
in adults with autism spectrum disorder

Sleeping Sound Special Needs

Deconstructing video-based instruction for students with and without autism spectrum disorders: Elements that enhance and hinder learning

Planning and Participation

Parenting Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Communication within close relationships of Adults with Asperger’s Syndrome

Nature of Autism

Investigating global and local adaptation in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and typically developed adults

Visual Attention and Emotional Engagement in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

“How was your day?”

Autism and Anxiety

Emotion Regulation in Adults

Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Australia: Transition to Adulthood

Using self-management intervention to increase compliance in a lower grade student with Autism Spectrum Disorder in mainstream school

> Can Children with high functioning autism plan for future events?

Comprehensive and unique profile of Australian ASD school leavers

 

Predictor of family adaptation to parenting a child with autism spectrum disorder

Researcher: Ms Lauren Eeles

Study aim/What is the project about?:  This project will aim to investigate the relationship between parental demand and the parental beliefs in predicting family adaptation in families raising a child with ASD.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Parents who are raising 1 or more child/ren aged between 4-12 years with a diagnosis of ASD

What is involved for participants: Completion of six surveys that measure parent demographic characteristics, child characteristics including severity of diagnosis, parental sense of coherence, uncertainty related to a child’s ASD, personal and family system resources, parental locus of control, and a measure of family quality of life.

Participants can access the survey by clicking on the following link here, or type this address into your browser https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NTBMGFM

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact (researcher): Ms Lauren Eeles
Email: eelespsych@outlook.com
Telephone: 0431 710 240

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends:  21/12/2018

 Back to list

 

Public library service provision with people with invisible disabilities

Researcher: Bec Muir under the supervision of Dr Kim Thompson, Charles Sturt University

Study aim: To find out what the information, access, services, and resource needs of people with an invisible disability are in relation to public libraries in Victoria

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Adults, aged 18 and over, who have Aspergers or are on the autism spectrum. You do not have to be a library member to participate in this study.

What is involved for participants: A 45 minute to 1 hour voice-recorded interview between yourself and the researcher. This interview will take place in a venue suitable to you, or online through Skype or FaceTime. We will ask you questions about your information needs and experiences with public libraries.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Researcher Contact: Bec Muir
Email:  rmuir@csu.edu.au
Telephone:  0401 250 219

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 30/10/2018

 Back to list

Sleeping Sound with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Researcher: Susannah Bellows

Study aim:
• Up to 85% of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) can experience sleep problems.
• Sleeping Sound is a brief treatment program for sleep problems. Early findings in children with developmental challenges have suggested that this program can improve their sleeping difficulties.
• This study aims to see whether the program improves sleep problems, as well as wellbeing and daily functioning in primary school aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: We are seeking families with children:
• Aged between 5 and 12 years
• With sleeping difficulties
• With a confirmed diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder without Intellectual Disability
• Living in Victoria, Australia

What is involved for participants:
• Complete a screening questionnaire and interview over the phone to determine whether the study is suitable for your family.
• Complete online surveys at the beginning, 3, 6 and 12 months.
• Your child will also be asked to complete a learning assessment at 6 months.
• If eligible, you and your child will be randomly allocated to either:
• The Sleeping Sound treatment program, which involves two free face-face treatment sessions with a trained clinician.
• The treatment as usual group.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Researcher: Susannah Bellows

Telephone: 03 9246 8471

Email: susannah.bellows@deakin.edu.au

Supervisor: Professor Nicole Rinehart

Email: nicole.rinehart@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9244 5469

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends:  30/11/2019

 Back to list

 

Relationship between intellectual ability, anxiety and sleep problems in adults on the autism spectrum

Researcher: Ms. Pura Ballester-Navarro and Associate Professor Amanda Richdale

Study aim: To investigate potential causes for the sleep disturbances commonly seen in individuals on the autism spectrum.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Adults on the autism spectrum, with no intellectual disability, aged 18 to 45 years to participate in a sleep study.

What is involved for participants:
• An initial appointment at OTARC, La Trobe University, to talk about the study and complete a one-on-one assessment.
• Online questionnaires to be done in your own time at home.
• 7-day online, sleep-wake diary – about 5 minutes morning and night, at home.
• Wearing an actigraphy device for 7 days
• Saliva collection (1 when you come to La Trobe, 1 night and 2 morning at home)

Participants can also win 1 of 3 , $30 gift cards.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Researcher: Ms Pura Ballester Navarro

Telephone: 03 9479 1742

Email: P.BallesterNavarro@latrobe.edu.au

Supervisor: Associate Professor Amanda Richdale

Email: A.Richdale@latrobe.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9479 1742

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends:  15/01/2018

 Back to list

Transition from paediatric to adult dental services for patients with Autism in Victoria, Australia

Researcher: Claudia Patricia Lopez Silva

Study aim: This study is about developing an understanding of the current oral health situation of adolescents with autism including the views of parents and carers.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Individuals with autism aged between 15 and 19 years of age and their parents and carers.

What is involved for participants: A 2-hour voice-recorded interview between yourself and your parent/carer and the researchers to identify factors associated with transitions to adult dental care. This will take place at a centre you currently visit or other venue suitable to you.
We will ask you questions about your dental health and your experience in what dental care you have had and are currently having.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Supervisor: A/Prof Mina Borromeo (Specialist, Special Needs Dentistry)

Email: Mina.Borromeo@monash.edu

Telephone: 03 9094 9528

Researcher: Dr Claudia Patricia Lopez Silva (Specialist in Training, Special Needs Dentistry)

Telephone: 03 9341 1529

Email: claudial1@student.unimelb.edu.au

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends:  31/12/2022

 Back to list

 

Oral Health and Dental Needs of Autistic and Non-autistic Adults

Researcher: Mr Premkumar Brahmbhatt

Study aim:

1) Identify the oral and dental health needs of autistic adults
2) Identify barriers that autistic adults may encounter when accessing oral health care

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: 1) Adults 18 years and above, with/without an autism diagnosis.

What is involved for participants: Participants will contribute greatly to a better understanding of the oral health of autistic adults, which could potentially improve the oral health of autistic adults.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Mr Prem Brahmbhatt

Email: premkumar.brahmbhatt@uq.net.au

Telephone: 07 3163 8267

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: Data Collection ends on 21/09/2017

 Back to list

Promoting bone and gut health in our Children (The PROUD Study)

Researcher: Dr Rachel Duckham (Principal Investigator) – Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN) at Deakin University

Study aim: Researchers from the Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN) at Deakin University, Sunshine Hospital, and The University of Georgia within the USA are currently looking for participants to take part in an exciting new study investigating the association between dietary intakes, bone health and gut function in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Selection criteria/Who can Participate:  Participants must be boys between 10 and 16 years with and without a diagnosis of ASD.

What is involved for participants: Participants will be asked to attend a 1.5-hour testing appointment at Deakin University to assess bone and muscle development. Following this appointment we will ask participants to complete three further tasks at home to assess levels of physical activity, dietary intake and gut function. Families will receive a $20 gift voucher in appreciation of their time and contribution to the study.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the PROUD research team below:

Contact: Dr Rachel Duckham (Principal Investigator) or Shae Rendall (Research Assistant)

Email: proud@deakin.edu.au  

Telephone: Rachel 03 9246 8305; Shae 03 9244 6445

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 1/03/2018

 Back to list

 Back to list

 

The Motor Social Matrix: Improving our knowledge of social and motor understanding in children

Researcher: Bianca Liew

Study aim: The aim of the research project is to investigate the reliability and validity of a novel tablet-based app, the Motor Social Matrix (MSM) through exploring whether the app is able to differentiate between children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and typically developing children. The MSM app has been developed by a research team at Deakin University and is intended as a measure of motor and social understanding in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: This study is seeking children aged between 8-10 years old.

What is involved for participants: Participation will involve attending a session lasting between 45 and 90 minutes each, where your child will complete a number of cognitive, social and motor measures together with an experienced researcher. During the session, you will receive with a number of questionnaires about your child’s social and motor functioning. On request, the researchers can provide you with a summary of your child’s motor and cognitive functioning from our study assessments. Sessions will be held at Deakin University in Burwood or at your home depending on your preference. Participants will go into the draw to win one of 2 $50 for their participation.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Bianca Liew (Researcher)

Email: bliew@deakin.edu.au

Telephone:  0438 518 823

Or

Supervisor: Dr Tamara May

Email: tamara.may@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9244 5084

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 01/09/2017

 Back to list

Predicting Well-being of Parents of Children with Autism

Researcher: Susanna Torbet

Study aim: This project seeks to investigate the factors that contribute to well-being among parents of children on the Autism spectrum. Areas of focus will include parenting stress, psychological distress, stigma, social support and attitudes towards ones-self. Better understanding of the experiences of parents is crucial for providing effective support services.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: This study is open to any parent or caregiver of a child that has been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Participants must be over the age of 18 years old, currently live in Australia and understand English proficiently.

What is involved for participants: Participation involves a single, 20 minute online survey. Participants will be given the opportunity to enter a draw to Win 1 of 4 x Coles/Myer Gift cards upon completion.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/asdparentresearch

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Susanna Torbet (Researcher)

Email:  susanna.torbet@student.adelaide.edu.au

Telephone:  0403 032 269

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 30/07/2017

 Back to list

Empirical Validation of a Model Predicting Depression, Anxiety and Stress in the Parents of Children with Autism

Researcher: Scarlett Bones

Study aim: Researchers at the University of Tasmania want to examine the factors associated with parental distress in the parents of children with Autism. Your participation could help us predict parental distress in the parents of children with Autism, which could inform treatment interventions.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: We are looking for parents of children with Autism AND parents of children without Autism.

What is involved for participants:To participate follow the link to complete our online survey:

https://tinyurl.com/k7dru8m

The survey should take around 45-60 minutes.

*Participants also go in the draw to win one of four $50 Coles-Myer vouchers

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Scarlett Bones (Researcher)
Email: bonessa@utas.edu.au

Or

Supervisor: Dr Kimberley Norris

Email: Kimberley.norris@utas.edu.au

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 30/11/2018

 Back to list

Supporting Families of Children with ASD in Australia

Researcher: Miranda Willet

Study aim: I am currently undertaking my Honours of Psychological Science at The University of Adelaide. Together with my colleagues, Dr Clemence Due and Dr Diana Dorstyn, I am conducting a research project called “Support for families of children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder living in Australia”.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: We are surveying parents and caregivers of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in order to identify the factors that enhance or prevent caregivers from seeking professional support.

What is involved for participants: Participation will involve completing a 15-20 minute online questionnaire approved by the University of Adelaide’s ethics committee. On completion you will enter a draw to receive one of ten $50 vouchers for rural participants or one of ten $50 vouchers for urban participants.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Miranda Willet (Researcher)
Email: miranda.willet@student.adelaide.edu.au

Telephone:  +61(0)8 8313 5693 or 0435 296 132

The survey can be accessed at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/C2KBBKR

If you know anyone else that might be interested in taking part in this research it would be greatly appreciated if you could pass this information on.

Research ends: 04/10/2017

 Back to list

Informing an Autism (and Developmental Disability) – Friendly Children’s Centre at Cabrini

Researcher: Nicola Williams

Study aim: Cabrini Hospital in collaboration with Deakin University are Informing an Autism (and Developmental Disability) Friendly Paediatric Ward at Cabrini.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: We are interested to hear from children, young people and families who have experienced care at the Cabrini Paediatric Ward to tell us about your experience.You are a young person with; or your child has autism or other developmental disability and have/has received care from Cabrini in the past three years

What is involved for participants: The participation demands are minimal. Each part respectively involves a single interview with the trained Research Fellow (20-30 mins parent; 10-20 minutes child).

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Nicola Williams (Researcher)
Email: Nicola.Williams@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: (03) 9246 6426

* Interviews close June 30th, 2017

Research ends: 31/12/2017

 Back to list

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers: Peter Donaldson

Study aim: Researchers from Deakin University, Monash University, and The Alfred are currently looking for participants to take part in a new study that investigates whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can improve social understanding and social communication in people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Participants must be aged between 14 and 30 years and have a diagnosis of ASD or Asperger’s. Participants under 18 years will require a parent or guardian to provide informed consent.

Participants will be asked to attend multiple sessions over a 12-month period at The Alfred, Monash University, and (if more convenient) Deakin University. Participants will undergo MRI brain scans, TMS sessions, and clinical assessments.

What is involved for participants: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a safe and non-invasive means of changing activity within specific areas of the brain. It is used in the treatment of depression, but there is also preliminary research suggesting that it could be effective in ASD.

You cannot take part in this study if you have ever had a seizure or have been assessed as having a moderate or severe intellectual disability. There are other factors that can prevent participation.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Peter Donaldson (Researcher)
Email: peter.donaldson@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: (03) 9246 8775

OR

Contact: A/Prof. Peter Enticott
Email: peter.enticott@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: (03) 9244 5504

Research ends: 19/4/2019

 Back to list

 

Parent and Professional Perception of Apps for Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Researchers: Wan Sim (Supervisor), Hena Farighi (Student Researcher)

Study aim: The study aims to increase knowledge and understanding of the needs of both parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders and the needs of professionals who work with these parents when they select apps for children with neurodevelopmental disorders.

Selection criteria/Who can Participate: Parents who are: (1) at least 21 years of age; (2) have children aged between 3 and 11 with a neurodevelopmental disorder; (3) reside in Australia most of the time.

Professionals who are: (1) at least 21 years of age; (2) work with parents of or children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their carers; (3) reside in Australia most of the time.

What is involved for participants: You will be asked to complete an online questionnaire asking about your mobile application (app) use and app perceptions, and some demographic questions. The questionnaire should take no longer than 15 minutes to complete. You will get the opportunity to go in the draw to win 1 of 6 $20 Coles Group and Myer e-vouchers.

This study has been approved by the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Hena Farighi (student researcher)
Email: hfar4@student.monash.edu

OR

Contact: Wan Sim (supervisor)
Email: wan.sim@monash.edu

Telephone: 0413 350 622

Research ends: 16/06/2017

 Back to list

 

Exploring the need to belong: An online survey of autistic and typical adults

Researchers: Dr Sue Watt and Ms Isabella Malouf

Study aim: The need to belong is a basic human drive, innately motivating us to seek, establish and maintain attachments with others. However, this need as experienced by adults on the autism spectrum is poorly understood. The present study attempts to address the scarcity of studies focusing on the need to belong in autistic adults.

Selection criteria: Adults, aged 18-years or over with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, as well as adults who don’t have an Autism Spectrum Disorder.

What is involved for participants: Participants will be invited to compete an online survey. The first few questions will ask them to indicate their consent to take part in the online survey, followed by some standard demographic information and as set of 69 questions covering various behaviours, belonging, satisfaction with relationships and loneliness. The online survey is likely to take approximately 20 minutes to compete.

Contact: Ms Isabella Malouf
Email: imalouf@myune.edu.au

OR

Dr Sue Watt

http://sue.watt@une.edu.au

Research ends: 05/07/2017

 Back to list

 

 

Fine Motor Skills, Social Function and Adaptive Function in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers:  Joel Crucitti

Study aim/background: Greater attention is required on how motor skills, particularly basic motor control and dyspraxia, predict the severity of autism. The proposed study seeks to address this.

Who can participate: The study will be recruiting male and females between the ages of 4 and 10 years with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis.

What is involved for participants: The study will involve testing the child’s fine motor skills for 20-30 minutes at two time points, approximately 8 months apart.  It is hypothesised that an improvement in fine motor skills will predict the child’s change in social and adaptive skills.

These motor skills are tested at the participants’ home. Parents will also be asked to complete questionnaires requiring approximately 90 minutes of their time at each of the two time points. Questionnaires will measure the child’s social and adaptive skills, and are completed in the parents’ own time.

Contact: If you are interested in finding out more about this project or becoming a participant, please contact the researcher/s below:

Contact: Joel Crucitti

Email: joel.crucitti@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 5227 1100

Research ends: 31/12/2019

 Back to list

 

School non-attendance in students with intellectual disability (ID)

Researchers:  Glenn Melvin

Study aim/background: The project aims to establish the rate of school non-attendance in students with an ID and build a profile of school non-attendance problems in this cohort by identifying the types of non-attendance. A further aim of the project is to identify the child, family and school/environmental factors that are associated with school non-attendance for students with an ID.

Sometimes children and young people with an intellectual disability have difficulty getting to school.

Current research shows that school participation has a strong association with school completion, and long term social and emotional health and wellbeing. Although we know that school non-attendance in this vulnerable group is around 50% higher than students without a disability, the reasons why aren’t well understood.

Who can participate: Parents of school students aged 5-18 years with an intellectual disability attending school in both metropolitan and rural Victoria will asked to complete a questionnaire about their child. Teachers will also be asked to complete questionnaires (with parental consent).

What is involved for participants: Researchers at Monash University’s Centre for Developmental Psychiatry and Psychology want to better understand the underlying factors of school non-attendance to inform policy and programs to reduce inequalities for these students in the future.

We are looking for parents to complete a questionnaire (about your child) that will take about 40 minutes to complete.

Contact: If you are interested in finding out more about this project or becoming a participant, please contact the researcher/s below:

Contact: Glenn Melvin Or Kylie Gray

Email: kites@monash.edu

Telephone: 03 9902 4557

Research ends: 31/12/2018

 Back to list

 

Stress and Coping in Teenagers with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers:  Bethany Sinclair

Study aim/background: The study focuses on what kind of things stress teenagers with HFA, and what they do to cope with these stressful situations. In particular, we are looking to understand the relationship between stress, coping and mental health for teenagers with HFA.

We are hoping to identify which coping strategies are more effective, in order to improve the outcomes for these teenagers. In order to do this, we will look at the use of coping strategies and changes in affective states over time. To our knowledge our study is the first of its kind.

Who can participate: Has your child been diagnosed with High Functioning Autism Spectrum DIsorder?

Are they between the ages of 12 and 19?

Researches at the Australian National University are inviting teenagers with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HFA) and their families to participate in an online study on stress, coping and anxiety and depression in teenages with HFA.

What is involved for participants: This study will examine how psychologists, teachers and other people can assist teenagers with HFA to better cope with their experience of stress.

Participation in the study will involve: Completing an online questionnaire that asks questions about stress, coping, anxiety and depression. Completing another, shorter questionnaire in three months.

If you and your child are interested in participating in this research, click on the following link: ANU Online Survey

The ethical aspects of this research have been approved by the ANU HUman Research Ethics Committee (ANU Ethics Protocol Number 2014/462)

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Beth Sinclair

Email: bethany.sinclair@anu.edu.au

Telephone: 02 6125 4100

Research ends: 31/06/2017

 Back to list

 

Unique Autism: Understanding differences between twins

Researchers:  Amanda Brignell

Study aim/background: Unique Autism in an identical twins approach to exploring epigenetic causes of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Researchers at the Royal Children’s Hospital are looking at possible causes of Autism Spectrum Disorder (autism) and the role of the environment, genes and how genes behave. Identical twins with Autism are rare and offer unique opportunity to further knowledge about potential causes of Autism.

Who can participate: We are looking for Victorian families with identical twins to take part in this research. If you live in Victoria, have identical twins aged between 2 – 14 years, and one of both twins have been diagnosed with Autism.

What is involved for participants: Methodology: Using an identical twins design where on or both twins have ASD we plan to utilise dimensional phenotyping to clearly assess the children’s range of abilities in dimensions such as cognition, communication and behaviour.

Using Guthrie card (new born blood spots) stored in the Victorian CLinical Genetic Services compared with saliva or blood upon presentation we aim to explore possible epigenetic changes in 3 ways.
1. Changes from birth to presentation between each point
2. Epigenetic difference between twins at time point one using Guthrie Card
3. Epigenetic difference between twins at time point two using bool and cheek cells

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Amanda Brignell

Email: amanda.brignell@rch.org.au

Telephone: 03 9345 4797

Research ends: 01/06/2017

 Back to list

 

Young People with disability and discrimination in public places

Researchers:  Cathy Vaughan

Study aim/background: Compared to their able-bodied peers, people with impairments have an increased risk of discrimination acts by other people. Yet people know little about what these acts are, how often they happen to young people with disabilities, and particularly about how this happens in public places.

Who can participate: Based on the stories of young people with impairments , this study seeks to produce new knowledge about when and how and where discrimination happens to young people with disabilities in public places o the effort can be made to prevent such discriminatory acts in teh teh future.

What is involved for participants: Participants will participate in up to two qualitative interviews over 2016/2017. As a thank you for your participation we will be offering you a Coles/Myer voucher of $30.

This study as ethics approval for the University of MElbourne Human Resources Ethics Committee (Ethics ID: 1545297.1)

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Dr. Carmel Sivaratnam

Email: c.vaughan@unimelb.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9035 6670

Research ends: 01/12/2017

 Back to list

 

ALLPLAY: Correlates and outcomes of NAB-AFL Auskick participation for primary school-aged children with disabilities

Researchers:  Dr Carmel Sivaratnam (Research Fellow)

Study aim/background: This study examines the impact of participation in organised physical activity, particularly the NAB AFL Auskick program for children with disabilities such as ASD. We are looking to recruit children with ASD who will be enrolling in AusKick for 2017, AND children who do not take part in any sport or physical activity (control group).

Who can participate: Based on the stories of young people with impairments , this study seeks to produce new knowledge about when and how and where discrimination happens to young people with disabilities in public places o the effort can be made to prevent such discriminatory acts in teh teh future.

What is involved for participants: Participation will involve attending 2 sessions lasting between 90 and 120 minutes each, where your child will complete a number of cognitive and motor measures together with an experienced researcher. Your child will also answer a number of brief audio-recorded interview exploring their view of the benefits and barriers to participation in organised physical activity. During the session, you will receive with a number of questionnaires about your child’s social and emotional functioning, as well as a brief questionnaire about their participation in physical activity. On request, the researchers can provide you with a summary of your child’s motor and cognitive functioning from our study assessments. Sessions will be held at Deakin University in Burwood or Geelong (Warun Ponds), depending on your preference, and you will be reimbursed for parking costs.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Dr. Carmel Sivaratnam

Email: carmel.sivaratnam@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9246 8383 extension 95240

Or

Contact: Jeremy Quek

Email: jeremy.quek@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9246 8743

This study is funded by a philanthropic donation from Moose Toys. The Chief Investigator of this study is Professor Nicole Rinehart.

Research ends: 29/11/2020

 Back to list

A Survey of Barriers and Facilitators to Participation in Organised Physical Activity for Children with a Disability within the Australia Community

Researchers:  Dr Nicole Papadopoulos

Study aim/background: This study aims to explore the benefits and barriers to participation in organised physical activity around Australia for children aged 4-17 years with physical and developmental disabilities and challenges.

Who can participate: Parents of children aged between 4-17 years who have a disability, developmental challenges, and/or additional needs are invited to participate. This includes children with diagnosed ASD, any other condition that affects cognitive, developmental, sensory, or mobility functions, and children who need extra planning for medical reasons. Sporting coaches from mainstream and/or inclusive sporting clubs are also invited to participate.

What is involved for participants: Participation will involve parents and coaches completing an online survey estimated to take approximately 20 minutes for a parent of one child, with an additional 5 minutes per child. Children are also invited to complete 2 questions (approximately 5 minutes).

The information from this survey will be used to plan future research and resources to better support developmentally vulnerable children to participate in physical activities.

This study is being conducted by the National Disability Insurance Agency in collaboration with Deakin University. This study has been approved by the Deakin University Human Research Ethics Committee [App #2016-336].

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Dr Nicole Papadopoulos

Email: allplay@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: 03 9244 5295

Website: www.allplaysportsanddance.org.au

Research ends: 10/03/2017

Back to list

Thinking About Objects

Researchers:  Rebekah White and Anna Remington

Study aim/background: We are interested in establishing whether rates of personification differ between autistic and non-autistic people. We are conducting a short (5-10 minute) online questionnaire, that invites the participant to indicate whether they experience certain object classes as having gender, personality, feelings, etc.

Who can participate: Autistic and non-autistic adults who think about objects.

What is involved for participants: What does the study involve? We are conducting a very brief (5-10 minute) online survey to investigate how autistic and non-autistic adults who think about objects.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

This research is conducted by Rebekah White and Anna Remington of University of Oxford, and Centre for Research in Autism and Education: University College London.

For any questions related to the survey please contact:

Contact: Rebekah White

Email: Rebekah.white@chch.ox.ac.uk
Telephone: +447 8890 51249

Completion of the survey will be considered consent. Please use the following link to access the questionnaire.

Thinking About Objects Questionaaire

Research ends: 01/06/2017

Back to list

 

The ASD Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours Survey Research

Researchers:  Professor Andrew Cashin

Study aim/background:  While central to the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) restrictive and repetitive behaviours often change over time and increase and decrease in intensity. We are not clear, however why this happens, typical patterns, and we definitely have no structured way of predicting when someone will get locked into these behaviours.

Who can participate: This survey forms part of the process of developing this knowledge. The survey is for parents and or guardians of people with ASD engaged in some form of primary or secondary schooling (in the approximate age range of 6-18 years). This includes parents and guardians of people with the diagnosis of ASD, Asperger’s Disorder, Autistic Disorder or Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (PDDnos).

What is involved for participants: What does the study involve? We understand the time and energy required to parent a person with ASD and very much appreciate the time taken to complete this survey. The survey will take approximately 25 minutes to complete. Answers can be saved and the survey completed at a later time if needed. The survey can be taken on the computer or mobile devices like smart phones or tablets.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

This research is conducted by Professor Andrew Cashin of Southern Cross University, Australia.

The research has been approved by the Southern Cross University Human Research Ethics Committee (approval ECN-16-249). For any concerns related to the ethical conduct of this research please contact the chair of the human research ethics committee Southern Cross University ethics.lismore@scu.edu.au.

For any questions related to the survey please contact:

Contact: Professor Andrew Cashin
Email: andrew.cashin@scu.edu.au

Completion of the survey will be considered consent.

Research ends: 30/04/2019

Back to list

 

The Social and Emotional Well-being of Females with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Does it differ from Males with high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, and from typical students?

Researchers:  Belinda Jarman

Study aim/background:  This study aims to contribute to an understanding of situations at school which many impact the social and emotional wellbeing of female students with HFASD/AS during their schooling, and how this compares to their mail counterpart, and to typical females and males.

Who can participate: Parents of male and female children aged between 7 and 14 years with high functioning Autism/Asperger’s Syndrome.

What is involved for participants: What does the study involve?

Completing an anonymous online survey. To access the survey follow this link.

Research Survey Link

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researchers below:

Student Investigator Belinda Jarman
Email: belinda.jarman@utas.edu.au

Or

Chief Investigator Dr Christopher Rayner
Email: christopher.rayner@utas.edu.au

Or

Co-Investigator Dr Nadia Ollington
Email: nadia.ollington@utas.edu.au
Or

Co-Investigator Professor Kim Beswick
Email: kim.beswick@utas.edu.au

Research ends: 31/12/2019

Back to list

 

Investigating Motor and Language Function in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers:  Mr. Samuel Pearce, Prof. Nicole Rinehart, Dr. Jarrad Lum.

Study aim/background:  Previous research suggests that motor (movement) abnormalities including “odd gait” (pattern of walking), are a key feature of ASD. Whether other features associated with this disorder, including level of language functioning, are related to these motor abnormalities is currently unknown. By trying to get a better picture and understanding of the gait profile in ASD, we hope to provide a better understanding of the disorder and to improve on the diagnostic criteria.

Who can participate: Children aged 6-11 years with or without an ASD diagnosis.

What is involved for participants: What does the study involve?

What is involved for participants: Participation will involve attending a single session at Deakin University Burwood Campus, and will take approximately 1.5 hours to complete. Your child will complete a brief intellectual assessment, language skills assessment, followed by an assessment of their walking profile which will involve completing a series of walking activities (e.g., walking at preferred pace, fast pace, along a straight line) on a rubber mat.

This study has been approved by the Deakin University Human Research Ethics Committee.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Mr Samuel Pearce (student researcher)
Email: spe@deakin.edu.au

OR

Prof. Nicole Rinehart (principal researcher)
Email: nicole.rinehart@deakin.edu.au
Telephone: 02 9244 5084

Research ends: 31/12/2017

Back to list

 

 

How I’m feeling: Measuring depression and anxiety in adolescents with an intellectual disability

Researchers: A/Prof. Kylie Gray, Dr Gelnn Melvin, Ms Lisa McGivern, Dr Carlie Park

Study background:  Emotional problems are often under recognised in young people with an intellectual disability.

The Monash University Centre for Developmental Psychiatry and Psychology are conducting research about how best to identify emotional difficulties in young people with an intellectual disability.

This projects aims to develop a visual questionnaire (on an iPad) that helps adolescents themselves provide information on difficulties they may be having with their emotions.

We are looking for parents who have a child aged 12-18 years with an intellectual disability that either does of does not experience difficulties with their emotions. You can still help with this study even if your child does not have emotional difficulties.

What is involved for participants: What does the study involve?
The study involves you completing two questionnaires done in your own time that will take a total of approximately 20-30 minutes to complete. We will also ask your child to complete a questionnaire on an iPad that we have developed for this study at our offices in Notting Hill or Monash Medical Centre Clayton.

The questionnaire will ask your child about their feelings and emotions. We may also ask your child again after two weeks to repeat this questionnaire. It will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete the questionnaire.

If you agree to participate, you will also be asked to give a questionnaire to your child’s teacher for them to complete about your child’s behaviour and emotions. It is up to you if you agree to the teacher completing the questionnaire. If so, the teacher will complete iot in their own time and will return it directly back to us.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact the researcher below:

Contact: Lisa McGivern
Telephone: 03 9905 0161
Email: lisa.mcgivern@monash.edu

Research ends: 31/12/2017

Back to list

 

Dads and mums of children with ASD: Wellbeing and support use (ASD)

Researchers: Monique Seymour, Sara Allen, Dr. Rebecca Giallo, and Dr. Katie Wood.

Study background:  We know from previous research that the health and wellbeing of fathers and mothers can influence children’s development, family functioning and parenting experiences. Men and women experience health and wellbeing concerns differently. They can also have different attitudes to accessing support services.

Despite this, there is limited information about the experiences of Australian fathers and mothers of children with an ASD, especially in regards to their mental health and use of support and services for their personal wellbeing.

There is even less research that has compared the difference experiences of fathers and mothers. Two parallel projects are being conducted: a) exploring fathers’ experiences of health services and support for their wellbeing while parenting a child with ASD; and b) exploring these experiences in mothers of children with ASD. It is hoped that the findings of these studies will provide important information for services about how to best support the wellbeing of both fathers and mothers raising children with ASD.

What is involved for participants: Fathers and mothers of children (aged 8-10 years) with ASD are being asked to participate in face-to-face interviews relating to their experiences of raising a child with an ASD. In particular, participants will be asked about their health and wellbeing, along with questions regarding their experiences of supports and services for their personal wellbeing.

This research is being conducted as part of the requirements of a Clinical PhD (Monique Seymour) and a Masters of Clinical Psychology (Sara Allen) at Swinburne University.

Contact: If you are interested in participating, have any questions or would like more information, please contact one of the researchers below:

Monique Seymour
PhD Candidate

mseymour@swin.edu.au

Sara Allen
Masters student
s.allen.swin@gmail.com

Dr Katie Wood
Primary Supervisor

cwood@swin.edu.au
(03) 9214 4627

Research ends: 17/04/2018

Back to list

 

 

An Investigation of the symptom profiles of girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Researcher: Rhonda Green

Study aim:  It is possible that girls with ASD are under-identified and may miss adequate support that could assist them to do better in school and social relationships. The current research aims to improve profiling of girls with ASD, thus contributing to better identification and support provision.
Methods used to help investigate possible reasons for under-identification in girls includes profiling girls with ASD for their ASD symptomatology and related anxiety and depression and comparing these with girls who don’t have ASD.

This research project aims to explore the ways that girls who have Autism Spectrum Disorder are different to girls who do not have a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. We invite girls between the ages of 6 to 17 years, who have a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder, and one of their parents to be part of this study.

The study is a cross-sectional sample design, involving the collection and measurement of cortisol in saliva together with completion of questionnaires from both girls and one of their parents.

What is involved for participants:The study involves the voluntary collection of three saliva samples and the completion of questionnaires. Rhonda will meet with participants personally at a time and place that is suitable for participants. This will take two to three short visits. Any information or personal details gathered in the course of this research will remain confidential. Participation in this study is completely voluntary and you may withdraw at any time without risking any negative consequences.

Contact:If you would like to be part of this research please email me, Rhonda Green, who is studying at the University of New England, at rgreen30@myune.edu.au with your name and contact details and Rhonda will contact you further about the research.

This project has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the University of New England (Approval Number: HE16-199, valid to 13/09/2017). The Principal project supervisor for this project is Professor Chris Sharpley,

csharpl3@une.edu.au

We look forward to working with you to contribute to a better understanding of girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder, and thank you for your consideration of this request

Research ends: 13/09/2017

Back to list

 

 

Autistic children and parental discipline – What do some parents and therapeutic professionals tell us about their views and experiences?

Researcher: Kristen Patnaude

Study aim:  The aim of this study is to explore the parental discipline of children living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It aims to explore the current disciplinary practices of some Australian parents of children with ASD, as well as the efficacy of such practices for children with ASD>

What is involved for participants: Participants will be required to follow a link to an online questionnaire consisting of 33 questions, a combination of which will be open and closed questions. Open ended questions will be seeking to gain a much knowledge about parental experiences of raising children with ASD as possible. The survey will take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

Upon contacting the researcher and registering interest, all participants will receive a copy of the Explanatory Statement, Consent Forms and ethics approval letter which will detail ow the data will be collected, stored and analysed as well as the voluntary nature of the participation.

If you would like to know more about this study or you are interested in taking
part please contact:

Contact: Kristen Patnaude (Honours Thesis)
Email: Kpat31@student.monash.edu
Telephone: 0422 460 973

Supervisor: Dr Bernadette Saunders
Telephone: 03 9903 4784

Research ends: 31/12/2016

Back to list

 

 

The experiences of dual enrolled students attending mainstream and special schools: The perspectives of students and their teachers

Researcher: Julia Nicholas

Study aim:  There is no evidence on best practice for teachers when taking reasonable steps to ensure dual enrolled students receive access to, and participate in, a quality educational program on the same basis as a student without a disability.

This investigation is designed to open a collaborative dialogue between the researcher and the participants with a focus on sharing ideas and strategies that best support dual enrolled students. The use of semi-structured interviews will provide both educators and students with an opportunity to share and express their views and perceptions so that their experience can be more clearly understood and their needs better met.

In Victoria a principal or regional director can approve and accept individual enrolments at a reduced attendance, thereby enabling dual enrolment. This makes it possible for students with disabilities to attend a mainstream school part of the week, and a special school for the remainder of the week. However, there is an absence of literature that focuses on the experiences of dual enrolled students and with disabilities, and the educators of dual enrolled students. Without research in this field it is difficult for education providers to determine what is best practice for promoting learning and development for dual enrolled students. This investigation is designed to open a collaborative dialogue between the researcher and the participants with a focus on sharing ideas and strategies that best support dual enrolled students.

What is involved for participants: Your child will be invited to participate in an audio recorded interview. The investigator also seeks your consent to collect your child’s Individual Learning Plan from each teacher. Classroom observations will take place at each school your child attends. Your child’s teachers will also be invited to participate in an interview.

For further details please contact:
Contact: Julia Nicholas (student investigator)
Email: julian0@utas.edu.au
Telephone: 0423 497 133

or

Contact: Dr Christopher Rayner

Email: Christopher.Rayner@utas.edu.au

Research ends: 31/12/2016

Back to list

 

Clinical Trial using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques to reduce inflexible behaviours and improve emotional regulation in autism spectrum disorders.

Researcher: Dr Natalia Albeins-Urios

Study aim:  Some people with a diagnosis of autism, Asperger’s syndrome or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) struggle when their routine changes and/or find difficult to manage their emotions. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether high definition transcranial magnetic stimulation (HD-tDCS), a form of non-invasive brain stimulation technique, can reduce inflexible behaviours and improve emotional regulation. HD-tDCS is a safe technique that emits a weak electrical current through 5 small electrodes placed in the right side of your head.

Participation involves: The clinical trial involves 5 consecutive daily sessions of HD-tDCS. Before and after the sessions you will complete some psychological and cognitive assessments.
The information gathered from this study will be used to gain a better understanding of the motor and neurological dysfunctions in ASD and PD, will help to better understand the underlying causes of ASD, significantly improve diagnostic outcomes for both these conditions; and may potentially have future treatment applications.
Participants will be compensated for their time with a $30 gift card.

Participants: We are inviting young people (16-30 years old) with a diagnosis of autism, Asperger’s syndrome or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to participate in a clinical trial within the Cognitive Neuroscience Unit (CNU), School of Psychology, Deakin University (Burwood campus).

What does the study involve?: This clinical trial involves 5 consecutive daily sessions of a non-invasive brain stimulation technique called high definition transcranial direct current stimulation, or HD-tDCS. This is a safe technique that emits a weak electrical current through 5 small electrodes placed in the right side of your head. This stimulation typically produces a light tingling and warming sensation on the head.

The goal of this study is to determine whether HD-tDCS reduces inflexible behaviours and improves your ability to manage your emotions. Before and after the stimulation sessions you will attend several sessions where the principal researcher will conduct psychological assessments. You will be compensated for your time.

Who is eligible?
1. People aged between 16 to 30 years old with a diagnosis of autism, Asperger’s syndrome or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with average/above average cognitive function (or IQ at least 55), and right-handed. Individuals under the age of 18 require parental consent to take part.
2. People without a serious medical condition (e.g. epilepsy).

If you would like to know more about this study or you are interested in taking
part please contact:

Contact: Dr. Natalia Albein-Urios
Email: natalia.albeinurios@deakin.edu.au

Telephone: +61 92517813

Research ends: 31/12/2017

Back to list

 

Evidence for shared neurobiology between Autism Spectrum Disorders and Parkinson’s disease

Researcher: Jessica Freeman

Study aim:  There is some evidence showing that both ASD and PD have strikingly similar abnormalities in body posturing during walking such as arm, head and trunk posturing compared to healthy individuals. Considering that both PD and ASD seem to share similar causes, these findings may suggest some commonality between the underlying causes of both conditions. The current study aims to assess any similarities in movement patterns to gain a better understanding of the motor and neurological dysfunctions in ASD and PD to 1) help to better understand the underlying causes of ASD; 2) significantly improve diagnostic outcomes for both these conditions; and 3) may potentially have future treatment applications.

Participation involves: Who are we looking for?
• We are looking for people over the age of 25yrs with Autism Spectrum Disorder to participate in a research study at Deakin University Burwood, looking at the walking similarities between ASD and Parkinson’s Disease.

What Does it Involve?
You will be required to attend 1 (approx. 2.5hrs) session at Deakin University in Burwood for a walking movement analysis, complete a social responsiveness scale and balance assessment.

The information gathered from this study will be used to gain a better understanding of the motor and neurological dysfunctions in ASD and PD, will help to better understand the underlying causes of ASD, significantly improve diagnostic outcomes for both these conditions; and may potentially have future treatment applications.
Participants will be compensated for their time with a $30 gift card.

If you would like to assist with this study or require further information, please contact either
Jessica Freeman
Phone: 03 5247 9560
Email: jessica.freeman@deakin.edu.au

OR

Dr Wei-Peng Teo
Phone: 03 9244 5229
Email: weipeng.teo@deakin.edu.au

Research ends: 01/03/2017

Back to list

 

The Australian Wellbeing Project

Researcher: Mr Kieran THorpe

Study aim:  This is the first time that the happiness of Australians with autism and their parents is to be studied. As such, the developmental trajectory of happiness/wellbeing for people with autism is unknown. However, we have a wealth of information on non-autistic people. We will use these comparative data to identify particular factors that can help us to promote positive outcomes for people with autism at an early stage, thereby helping to prevent the development of anxiety and depression. This research will be conducted online.

Participation involves: Who are we looking for?
• We are looking for parents who have a child (18 years or younger) with an autism spectrum condition.
• If your son or daughter is between 13 to 18 years, they can also participate in the online survey. Your son or daughter will be emailed a web link (after their parent/caregiver has completed the survey).
• Adults 18 years and over

To participate
1. Go to www.wellbeingproject.net.au
2. Spend approx. 15 minutes completing the survey
3. Enter to win 1 of 8 gift vouchers valued at $40

For more information, please contact the Lead Researcher:

Contact: Mr. Kieran Thorpe

Email: kieran.thorpe@deakin.edu.au

Research ends: 20/10/2018

Back to list

 

Bodily sensation topography and self-report evaluations of interoceptive awareness
in adults with autism spectrum disorder

Researcher: Timothy Hatfield

Study aim:  You are invited to participate in this research project conducted from within the Research School of Psychology at The Australian National
University.

The project is investigating the sensory experience of interoception, that is, the awareness of internal bodily stimuli, in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Participation involves: What you will be asked to do? This study is completely online. Participation in this research study is voluntary and you can decline to take part or withdraw from the research at any stage, without providing an explanation.

The study questionnaire will ask you about your ASD diagnosis, recent experiences of bodily awareness, and feelings of stress, anxiety and depression. In addition you will be asked to use a new body mapping tool that seeks to explore where in the body people tend to feel internal sensations. The entire study will take approximately 50-90 minutes to complete.

The study has been approved by The Australian National University Human Research Ethics Committee (Protocol: 2015/762).

Who is Eligible?
*Participants must be over the age of 18.
*Participants must have a primary diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder.
*Participants must speak English

If you would like to participate please use this link ANU Autism Survey Link

To find out more about this Australian National University, Canberra study please contact:

Contact: Timothy Hatfiled
Email: timothy.hatfield@anu.edu.au

Contact: Chloe: Honours in Psychology (Fourth Year),
Email: cemonson@deakin.edu.au

Research ends: 01/01/2017

Back to list

Sleeping Sound Special Needs

Researchers: Stephanie Johns, Chloe Emonson

Study aim: Stephanie Johns and Chloe Emonson are postgraduate psychology students at Deakin University who are researching sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability under the supervision of Dr Nicole Papadopoulos and Nicole Rinehart.

The aim of this research is to understand sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who also have an intellectual disability (ID) in order to inform a sleep treatment. Parents of children aged 6 to 13 with a diagnosis of ASD and ID will be asked to complete a survey about their children’s sleep and behaviour as well as their own mental wellbeing.

Participation involves: This study involves participating in a focus group with a card-sorting activity, and a group interview/discussion about your experiences of anxiety, taking approximately 1-2 hours.

As a thank you, participants will receive a $30 Coles-Myer voucher.

To find out more about this Deakin University study please contact:

Contact: Stephanie: Graduate Diploma of Psychology (Fourth Year), 0422 242 183
Email: psychology.stephanie@gmail.com

Contact: Chloe: Honours in Psychology (Fourth Year),
Email: cemonson@deakin.edu.au

Research ends: 01/03/2018

 

Back to list

 

Deconstructing video-based instruction for students with and without autism spectrum disorders: Elements that enhance and hinder learning

Researchers: Emily Fitzgerald, Charlotte Ashton, Hui Kee Yap

Study aim: We are undertaking research at Monash University to determine the relative effectiveness of video-modelling and virtual reality for teaching children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Lego construction skills. This study will involve participants viewing two Lego construction tasks; one will be in the format of video display and the other in virtual reality. Participants will then be provided with an opportunity to imitate the models behaviour and reconstruct the Lego task presented.

Rates of skill acquisition will be calculated to determine how effective each intervention is at teaching children.

We are looking for children aged from 3 to 6 years, who have been diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder to participate in this study.

Participation involves: Participation in this study will involve an initial phone interview with parents (30-45 minutes). Subsequently, participants will be required to attend a number of assessments conducted at Monash University, Clayton Campus, by student investigators (Charlotte, Emily and Hui Kee; total time estimated to take 3-5 hours).

A fine motor assessment, a picture matching assessment, and a preference assessment will be conducted pre treatment. During the research phase, your child will be involved in both conditions. In the video modeling condition, your child will be asked to view a video and then complete a construction task with Lego. In the virtual reality condition, your child will have a virtual reality headset placed on their head and asked to view a video within a virtual environment. They will then be asked to complete a construction task with lego.
Contact: Emily Fitzgerald, 0417 497 450
Email: Esfit1@student.monash.edu

Contact: Charlotte Ashton, 0468 400 548
Email: Ceash1@student.monash.edu

Contact: Hui Kee Yapp, 0478 110 099

Research ends: 31/12/2016

Back to list

 

 

Planning and Participation

Researchers: Francesca Lami (PhD candidate) and Prof. Katrina Williams
 

Study aim: Researchers at The University of Melbourne and The Royal Children’s Hospital are trying to understand if certain thinking skills known as ‘executive functioning’ in young people with ASD are associated with problems in everyday tasks and participation in social and community activities.

Adolescents with ASD with normal or superior intelligence can experience difficulties with adaptive behaviour and have less community participation. A delay in the maturation of executive functioning is described in some young people with ASD. This study aims to investigate if and how adaptive behaviours, participation, ASD behaviours and executive functioning abilities are linked.

We are seeking young people:
• 10-16 years old
• Diagnosed with ASD with normal intelligence (named also “high functioning autism” or “Asperger syndrome” or “high functioning pervasive developmental disorder”)

Participation involves: Participation in this research involves:
• Your child completing an assessment and some questionnaire (either at The Royal Children’s Hospital or at your home)
• Parents completing some questionnaires and an interview

Young people willing to be involved in the study will be assessed using neuropsychological tests and they, and their parents, will also be asked to complete questionnaires.

A brief report of the assessment results will be given to you.

If you would like to participate please contact Francesca Lami.

 

Contact: Francesca Lami, (03) 9345 4620

Email: francesca.lami@rch.org.au

This study has been approved by the RCH Human Research Ethical Committee.

Research ends: 13/09/2017

Back to list

 

Parenting Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers: Carla Grillo, Sarah Niblock & Nursaffiah Mohd Zambri
 

Study aim: The research project investigates the relationship between child problem behaviours and various parental characteristics, including wellbeing, in parents of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This research may help us better understand the relationship between factors such as coping style and parent wellbeing.

It is hoped that the findings can contribute to developing intervention programs aimed at improving the well-being of parents of children with a disability.

Participation involves: Parents will be invited to participate in an online survey.

You are invited to participate in the research project described above. It will involve completion of an online survey, which has questions about your demographics (e.g., your gender, age at which your child was diagnosed with ASD) and questionnaires relating to parent well being and child behavior. The survey should take around 30 minutes of your time.

If you would like to participate please use this link ACU Autism Survey Link
or require further information, please contact: David Hamilton at david.hamilton@acu.edu.au

Contact: This research project is being undertaken as part of the requirements of a Master of Psychology (Final Year) at Australian Catholic University.


Contact:
Supervisor Dr David Hamilton, +613 9953 3118

Email: david.hamilton@acu.edu.au

Research ends: 31/10/2016

Back to list

Communication within close relationships of Adults with Asperger’s Syndrome

Researcher: Bronwyn Wilson
 

Study aim: This research focuses on adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), their close relationships, and the impact that ASD has on communication within these relationships. Children with ASD become adults with ASD. As they mature, the many difficulties children with ASD experience can intersect with the multiple and complex social situations adults typically have to negotiate, but the majority of studies concerning ASD are focused on children. Very little research directs its attention to adults on the Spectrum and even less is focused on their relationships. Through collaborative inquiry by using an advocacy/participatory approach, this study addresses this gap by exploring communication within the close relationships of adults on the Spectrum.

Who can participate: We are looking for male and female volunteers aged from 18 years with an Autism Spectrum Disorder Level 1 (Asperger’s Syndrome) or are you in a close relationship with an adult with an Autism Spectrum Disorder Level 1 (Asperger’s Syndrome)?

If the answer to either of these questions is yes and you are at least 18 years old, you are invited to participate in a study exploring communication patterns and resulting difficulties that can occur within the close relationships of adults with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Participation involves: The survey component of the study should only take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete. A detailed investigation of the issues that emerge from your survey answers will take place later during the follow-on interview component of the study.

If you would like to participate or require further information, please click on the link below to access the study:

Edith Cowan University Questionnaire Link

This research project is being undertaken as part of the requirements of a PhD at Edith Cowan University.

Contact: Supervisor Associate Professor Deslea Konza, 08 6304 5797 Email: d.konza@ecu.edu.au
Contact:
Associate Supervisor Dr Susan Main, 08 6304 6528 Email: s.main@ecu.edu.au

Research ends: 01/01/2018

Back to list

Nature of Autism

Researchers: Bruna Bulich, Holly Moreton, Kaitlin Sherriff, Kaitlyn Owne-Tighe, Alex Peponis, Leigh Radnay, Ella Kraus, Shannon Arfaras 

Study aim: Autism is known to disturb social and communication functions, but a cursory examination of clinical literature reveals many other things are disturbed for children and adults with Autism. Because of this, this project aims to undertake a broader perspective, evaluating children with Autism on a wider front to explore the nature of their Autism. We want to clinically evaluate children with Autism on a number of measures. These include assessments of Autism, adaptive function, social function, emotional function, creativity, well-being, self-esteem, mood, and basic motor skills.

Who can participate: We are looking for male and female volunteers aged between 10-20 years diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder whose parents would be willing to complete an online survey. After this parents will be contacted to arrange a time for assessment of the young person.

Participation involves: It will involve completing an online survey and some fun activities to assess movement skills, mood and creativity, which take approximately 90 minutes.

Contact: If you are interested, please access to eh questionnaire via the following link.

Deakin Questionnaire Link ‘Nature of Autism’
Contact Supervisor: Associate Professor Mark Stokes at Deakin University.
Email:
mark.stokes@deakin.edu.au

Research ends: 31/07/2017

Back to list

Investigating global and local adaptation in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and typically developed adults

Researchers:Jeroen van Boxtel and Chiara Killey

Study aim:This study aims to replicate and extend previous findings that have evidenced perceptual adaptation differences between adults with ASD and typically developed (TD) individuals, in the context of human movement. If differences are observed in adaptation to biological motion, this may assist with understanding how individuals with ASD perceive and interpret bodily movement differently. This may assist in understanding social cognition in ASD.

Who can participate: We are looking for male and female volunteers with high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), aged 18+, with no significant visual or neurological impairments, to take part in a study examining whether traits that are generally associated with autism are related to the process of adapting to stimuli.

Participation involves: It will involve completing an electronic questionnaire relating to social interests, a brief IQ measure and a simple visual task on a standard PC, which involves looking at stimuli, and responding based on your perception. Your participation will take between 1 ½ and 2 hours. In appreciation for your time, you will receive $15 per hour.

Contact: If you are interested, please contact Chiara Killey at Monash University, School of Psychological Sciences:
Email: cmkil1@student.monash.edu.au

Contact: This study has been reviewed by, and received ethics clearance
by the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee. – MUHREC Approval CF16/624 – 2016000302

Research ends: 01/06/2017

Back to list

Visual Attention and Emotional Engagement in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researcher: Dr Grace Thompson

Study aim: We invite you and your child to participate in this innovative study aiming to better understand how to motivate visual attention and emotional engagement in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
We are going to explore two different activities – music and speech – and compare them to discover the similarities and differences in the children’s visual attention and emotional engagement.

To take part, your child will need to:
• Be aged 7-10 years old
• Have a confirmed diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder
• Be able to sit and watch approximately 4 minutes of videos of songs and story telling (you will need to attend this session with your child, and will also have a phone call with the researchers to help get ready for the assessment). The assessment session will take place at The University of Melbourne, Parkville)
• Have no hearing or visual impairment

Contact: If you are interested, please contact Dr Grace Thompson at the University of Melbourne:

Email: graceat@unimelb.edu.au
Phone number: +61 3 9035 8978

Research ends: 31/12/2016

Back to list

“How was your day?”

Researchers: Lesley Stirling and Lindsay Pamment

Study aim: The Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre (OTARC), University of Melbourne and the Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism are running a new research study, investigating how children with ASD speak about their day at school. “How was your day?” is looking in particular at the conversations that take place in the home. You will help us to understand the various ways in which children with an ASD communicate and converse about their school day, which will also help us to define any potential barriers which may ultimately be impairing their ability to enjoy school, and succeed at school to their fullest.

Who can participate: We are inviting parents who have a child with an ASD in Grades 4, 5 or 6 (aged about 8-12 years) at a mainstream Victorian primary school, and who speak English at home.
What does participating involve? As the parent/primary caregiver, you will be required to complete an information pack. You will then record two natural conversations between you and your child on two different days (audio-visual equipment will be provided as well as instructions and support). At the end of the week the child will be invited to complete a short survey interview.

Contact: Lindsay Pamment, lindsay.pamment@unimelb.edu.au

Research ends: 30/12/2016

Back to list

Autism and Anxiety

Researchers: Mirko Uljarević, Amanda Richdale & Andrew Halim

Study aim: Anxiety in adults with an Autism Spectrum Condition is poorly understood, and to date there has been little research to understand their experience with anxiety, specifically in the vital transition period from school to adulthood. The move from school to adult life can be an extremely challenging and stressful time for people with an Autism Spectrum Condition. This study aims to understanding anxiety in adults with an Autism Spectrum Condition, how it is experienced, and how this differs from individuals without an Autism Spectrum Condition.

Selection criteria: 18 – 40 year old adults with an Autism Spectrum Condition, as well as adults who have a diagnosis of anxiety but don’t have Autism.

What is involved for participants: Participants will be invited to be a part of a small focus group where they will be able to share experiences and views of anxiety, to describe what it is like for them, and how it feels. They will also be asked to complete a Q-sort task in which they are asked to sort a series of statements, and participate in a group discussion/interview about their experiences of anxiety.

Contact: Mr Andrew Halim 17071843@students.latrobe.edu.au or Dr Mirko Uljarevic m.uljarevic@latrobe.edu.au

Research ends: 30/12/2016

Back to list

Emotion Regulation in Adults

Researchers: Amanda Richdale, Mirko Uljarević & Ru Ying Cai

Funding: Autism CRC

Study aim: Emotion regulation is the ability to control our behaviour in response to an emotion we feel, such as anger, anxiety, frustration, joy. In the general population research has shown that ability to regulate one’s emotion is associated with a range of positive outcomes, such as academic, employment and social success. On the other hand, inability to control one’s emotion can lead to psychopathology. But there has not been much research with individuals diagnosed with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) to see whether the same applies to them. Hence, the aim of the study is to explore the relationship between emotion regulation and associated outcomes in adults diagnosed with ASC.

What is involved for participants: Participant will be asked to complete an online survey, attend a one-on-one session at the Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, and complete a 5-day diary on emotions they experience in their daily life and how they regulate them.

Contact: Ms Ru Ying Cai r.cai@latrobe.edu.au or Dr Mirko Uljarevic d.uljarevic@latrobe.edu.au

Research ends: 30/12/2016

Back to list


Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Australia: Transition to Adulthood

The purpose of this research project is to identify factors that support, and factors that are barriers to a successful transition to adulthood after high school. Transition is defined as the shift from school to employment, tertiary education, independent living and social interaction as a young adult. This research is aimed at young adults aged 18-25 with ASD.

The research team at the University of Southern Queensland requests your assistance through the completion of the online survey. This should take no longer than 30 minutes of your time. If you would like to participate in the survey please click on the following link:

Survey Link: https://usqadfi.au1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6feu4EWVr6y3BGt

Principal Researcher: Yosheen Pillay
Yosheen.Pillay@usq.edu.au
Facebook: www.Autism.Transition.Research

Research ends: 31/10/2016

Back to list

Using self-management intervention to increase compliance in a lower grade student with Autism Spectrum Disorder in mainstream school

Have the teachers told you that it is difficult to get your child to follow their instructions in school?

We are looking for a Year 1 or 2 child diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder who is currently enrolled in a private school (with independent or Catholic school). The teachers have given feedback to you that it is difficult to get your child to comply with their instructions in the school.

This research study aims to understand the effectiveness of getting your children in mainstream primary schools to be compliant through the use of self-management strategies.

This project will take place entirely in a school setting. The researcher will conduct teacher interviews and observations of your child in the school. The researcher will also work with your child to teach him/her how to monitor and manage his/her own behaviour during this study. After the intervention, the researcher will continue to observe your child to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. As this is a small-scaled intervention study, it is expected that the researcher will work intensively with your child and his/her teachers for 1 to 2 terms.

If you would like to participate in this research, please contact Ms Pei Ling Lee (student researcher) at pllee21@student.monash.edu or 0450 972 348

Research study is approved by Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee

Research ends: 31/10/2016

Back to list

Can children with high functioning autism plan for future events?

Researchers: Serene Chua (Master of Psychology/PhD candidate), Deborah Clayton (Masters of Psychology candidate) and Associate Professor Gill Terrett

Study aim: The presence of repetitive and restricted patterns of behaviour is commonly observed in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet this characteristic is still currently not well understood. Inflexible behaviours in ASD have recently been linked to the possible compromised ability to imagine future events known as future thinking. At the Australian Catholic University, we are researching whether future thinking may be affected in children with ASD. We hope that our findings will shed light on the inflexible behaviours observed in these children and enable effective training and/or accommodations to be made by teachers and parents at home and in the classroom to promote each child’s learning potential.

Who can participate: Participants can be children aged 8-12 years who have high functioning autism spectrum disorder or Asperger’s Syndrome. Children who do not have a developmental disorder are also welcome to participate.

Participation involves: Your child will play two computer games, do some puzzle-like tests and answer a range of verbally presented questions. These tasks will be completed over two sessions which will take approximately 1-2 hours in each session. A mutually convenient time and place can be arranged with the researchers. One adult and one child movie ticket will be offered to thank you for your participation.

Contact: For more information or to participate, please contact:

Serene Chua at jiuswan.chua@myacu.edu.au

Mobile: 0490 307 412

OR

Deborah Clayton at ellen.mcdermott@myacu.edu.au

Mobile: 0490 320 126

This project is supervised by Associate Professor Gill Terrett: Gill.Terrett@acu.edu.au, (03) 9953 3121

Research ends: 31/5/2019

 

Back to list

Comprehensive and unique profile of Australian ASD school leavers

Researchers from the Autism CRC and Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre are conducting a longitudinal study with the main aim of understanding the process of transitioning from school to adult life for Australian students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their families. For this purpose we are inviting young people with an autism spectrum condition who are in their final year of school, or first year post school (aged 15-25) and their parents or guardians, to participate in a longitudinal survey.

Research ends: 30/06/2017

To find out more, you can contact Dr Mirko Uljarevic (M.Uljarevic@latrobe.edu.au) or Ms Ru Ying Cai (R.Cai@latrobe.edu.au) or you can follow these two links:

http://www.autismcrc.com.au/longitudinal-study-school-leavers-autism

http://otarc.blogs.latrobe.edu.au/longitudinal-study-of-school-leavers-with-autism/

Back to list

 

 

 


 

Page updated: 22-11-16